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dc.contributor.authorKhaitov, Botir
dc.contributor.authorPatiño-Ruiz, José David
dc.contributor.authorPina, Tatiana
dc.contributor.authorSchausberger, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-08T08:12:03Z
dc.date.available2020-06-08T08:12:03Z
dc.date.issued2015es
dc.identifier.citationKhaitov, B., Patiño‐Ruiz, J. D., Pina, T., & Schausberger, P. (2015). Interrelated effects of mycorrhiza and free‐living nitrogen fixers cascade up to aboveground herbivores. Ecology and evolution, 5(17), 3756-3768.es
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11939/6506
dc.description.abstractAboveground plant performance is strongly influenced by belowground microorganisms, some of which are pathogenic and have negative effects, while others, such as nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, usually have positive effects. Recent research revealed that belowground interactions between plants and functionally distinct groups of microorganisms cascade up to aboveground plant associates such as herbivores and their natural enemies. However, while functionally distinct belowground microorganisms commonly co-occur in the rhizosphere, their combined effects, and relative contributions, respectively, on performance of aboveground plant-associated organisms are virtually unexplored. Here, we scrutinized and disentangled the effects of free-living nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum (DB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae (AMF) on host plant choice and reproduction of the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae on common bean plants Phaseolus vulgaris. Additionally, we assessed plant growth, and AMF and DB occurrence and density as affected by each other. Both AMF alone and DB alone increased spider mite reproduction to similar levels, as compared to the control, and exerted additive effects under co-occurrence. These effects were similarly apparent in host plant choice, that is, the mites preferred leaves from plants with both AMF and DB to plants with AMF or DB to plants grown without AMF and DB. DB, which also act as AMF helper bacteria, enhanced root colonization by AMF, whereas AMF did not affect DB abundance. AMF but not DB increased growth of reproductive plant tissue and seed production, respectively. Both AMF and DB increased the biomass of vegetative aboveground plant tissue. Our study breaks new ground in multitrophic belowground–aboveground research by providing first insights into the fitness implications of plant-mediated interactions between interrelated belowground fungi–bacteria and aboveground herbivores.es
dc.language.isoenes
dc.publisherWiley online Libraryes
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectAboveground-belowground interactionses
dc.subjectArbuscular mycorrhyzaes
dc.subjectMultitrophic interactionses
dc.titleInterrelated effects of mycorrhiza and free-living nitrogen fixers cascade up to aboveground herbivoreses
dc.typearticlees
dc.authorAddressInstituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, Carretera CV-315, Km. 10,7 - 46113 Moncada (València)es
dc.entidadIVIACentro de Protección Vegetal y Biotecnologíaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.1654es
dc.identifier.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ece3.1654es
dc.journal.issueNumber17es
dc.journal.titleEcology and Evolutiones
dc.journal.volumeNumber5es
dc.page.final3768es
dc.page.initial3756es
dc.source.typeelectronicoes
dc.subject.agrisF60 Plant physiology and biochemistryes
dc.subject.agrovocFitness (physical)es
dc.subject.agrovocNitrogen fixationes
dc.subject.agrovocSpider miteses
dc.type.hasVersionpublishedVersiones


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