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dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorCruz-Garcia, Felipe
dc.contributor.authorRomero, Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-01T10:12:40Z
dc.date.available2017-06-01T10:12:40Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationMcClure, Bruce, Cruz-Garcia, Felipe, Romero, C. (2011). Compatibility and incompatibility in S-RNase-based systems. Annals of Botany, 108(4), 647-658.
dc.identifier.issn0305-7364
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11939/5616
dc.description.abstractBackground S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI) occurs in the Solanaceae, Rosaceae and Plantaginaceae. In all three families, compatibility is controlled by a polymorphic S-locus encoding at least two genes. S-RNases determine the specificity of pollen rejection in the pistil, and S-locus F-box proteins fulfill this function in pollen. S-RNases are thought to function as S-specific cytotoxins as well as recognition proteins. Thus, incompatibility results from the cytotoxic activity of S-RNase, while compatible pollen tubes evade S-RNase cytotoxicity. Scope The S-specificity determinants are known, but many questions remain. In this review, the genetics of SI are introduced and the characteristics of S-RNases and pollen F-box proteins are briefly described. A variety of modifier genes also required for SI are also reviewed. Mutations affecting compatibility in pollen are especially important for defining models of compatibility and incompatibility. In Solanaceae, pollen-side mutations causing breakdown in SI have been attributed to the heteroallelic pollen effect, but a mutation in Solanum chacoense may be an exception. This has been interpreted to mean that pollen incompatibility is the default condition unless the S-locus F-box protein confers resistance to S-RNase. In Prunus, however, S-locus F-box protein gene mutations clearly cause compatibility. Conclusions Two alternative mechanisms have been proposed to explain compatibility and incompatibility: compatibility is explained either as a result of either degradation of non-self S-RNase or by its compartmentalization so that it does not have access to the pollen tube cytoplasm. These models are not necessarily mutually exclusive, but each makes different predictions about whether pollen compatibility or incompatibility is the default. As more factors required for SI are identified and characterized, it will be possible to determine the role each process plays in S-RNase-based SI.
dc.language.isoen
dc.titleCompatibility and incompatibility in S-RNase-based systems
dc.typearticle
dc.date.issuedFreeFormSEP 2011
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aob/mcr179
dc.journal.issueNumber4
dc.journal.titleAnnals of Botany
dc.journal.volumeNumber108
dc.page.final658
dc.page.initial647
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.source.typeImpreso


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