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dc.contributor.authorBelliure, Belen
dc.contributor.authorSabelis, Maurice W.
dc.contributor.authorJanssen, Arne
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-01T10:11:03Z
dc.date.available2017-06-01T10:11:03Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationBelliure, B., Sabelis, Maurice W., Janssen, Arne (2010). Vector and virus induce plant responses that benefit a non-vector herbivore. Basic and Applied Ecology, 11(2), 162-169.
dc.identifier.issn1439-1791
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11939/4807
dc.description.abstractThe negative cross-talk between induced plant defences against pathogens and arthropod herbivores is exploited by vectors of plant pathogens: a plant challenged by pathogens reduces investment in defences that would otherwise be elicited by herbivores. This negative cross-talk may also be exploited by non-vector herbivores which elicit similar anti-herbivore defences in the plant. We studied how damage by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and/or infection with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) affect the performance of a non-vector arthropod: the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, a parenchym feeder just like F occidentalis. Juvenile survival of spider mites on plants inoculated with TSWV by thrips was higher than on control and on thrips-damaged plants. However, thrips damage did not reduce spider-mite survival as compared to the control, suggesting that the positive effect of TSWV on spider-mite survival is independent of anti-thrips defence. Developmental and oviposition rates were enhanced on plants inoculated with TSWV by thrips and on plants with thrips damage. Therefore, spider mites benefit from TSWV-infection of pepper plants, but also from the response of plants to thrips damage. We suggest that the positive effects of TSWV on this non-vector species cannot be explained exclusively by cross-talk between anti-herbivore and anti-pathogen plant defences. (C) 2010 Gesellschaft fur Okologie. Published by Elsevier Gmbh. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.titleVector and virus induce plant responses that benefit a non-vector herbivore
dc.typearticle
dc.date.issuedFreeForm2010
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.baae.2009.09.004
dc.journal.abbreviatedTitleBasic Appl.Ecol.
dc.journal.issueNumber2
dc.journal.titleBasic and Applied Ecology
dc.journal.volumeNumber11
dc.page.final169
dc.page.initial162
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.source.typeImpreso


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